Longline Cardi Love: McCall’s 6803

By | April 5, 2018

Dudes, longline cardigans are everywhere. Seriously. And I want one.

There’s the Driftless, the Annie, the Kinder, the Blackwood…

And what do I do? Tweak a generic Big 4 pattern to get what I want. Because that’s what I do.

While I love the Blackwoods I keep seeing in my Insta feed, I already had a cardigan pattern on file — McCall’s 6803.

This model will cut you. Don’t try her.

Since I love tweaking patterns, I wanted to try to create the look of the RTW and indie cardigans I’ve been seeing with something I already had on hand. I used a hacci sweater knit from Girl Charlee, rolled up my sleeves, and went to work.

Turns out, it really didn’t require that much sleeve-rolling or work. I just lengthened the front, back, pocket, and band pieces by as much as the fabric would allow, and that pretty much gave me what I wanted. I only had two yards of this fabric, so I was limited in how much length I could add. I measured a RTW longline cardi I bought a few months ago (before I started sewing again) and approximated the length to that.

Spoiler alert: it worked. This is exactly the look I was going for, and I’m glad I was able to use something from my (overflowing? extensive? superfluous?) pattern collection. This sweater is so cozy and I love the larger pockets. So good for holding my phone and burying my hands in!

Much cozy. Very pockets.

I do wonder how long this piece will last. The fabric went through the wash well, and is SO soft! It’s almost… too soft. I know, I know, ridiculous! I’m just concerned it’s going to pill too soon, even though it hasn’t shown any signs yet. If it does, at least I know how to snag myself another longline cardi, since this project was super easy to make. I also wasn’t sure about the chevron print. I know chevrons are super played out, but I was still drawn to this fabric and the richness of the print. In the end, I like it, so I don’t really care what the current status of chevron is in the fashion world. (Seriously, I wear orthopedic shoes. I don’t think the fashion world considers my opinion all that relevant.)

Action Shot!

Besides the length, the only other changes I made to the pattern were to narrow the sleeves quite a bit and also shorten them. This is a unisex pattern, which in my experience, means that the smallest size is still too big for smaller women. Knowing that, I wasn’t surprised that I needed to remove a ton of width from the sleeves, and let’s face it, I’m also a sucker for skinny sleeves. Oh! I also removed the buttonholes and buttons to better mimic the RTW versions I was into. Next time I make this, if I need another version or a replacement (solid color? yes, so necessary!), I’ll try to tweak the band at the back neck, where it totally gapes on me.

Neckband, what are you even doing? Also: camoflage sleeves!

I would also add some length back to the sleeves. I swear I tried it on and marked the appropriate length, but the sleeves in the finished product are a bit too short. Not actually too short but, like, too short to constantly tuck my hands up into, which is what I was going for. Oh well. Appropriate sleeve length it is then.

Finally, budget. The fabric was $12.60 for two yards, with no notions needed. Not bad, and I’m guessing I’ll have my cost per wear down to under $1 (always my goal) before the end of spring.

Welcome to the closet, my Longline Love!

2 thoughts on “Longline Cardi Love: McCall’s 6803

  1. Sandra

    Eureka! I too have been searching for the perfect long cardigan pattern, and I too have this pattern in my stash. After I bought it, I’d put it aside as being too Mr. Rogers (not that he wasn’t a very fine person, I just have a different sense of style!). Your alterations to the pattern turn it from grandfatherly to of the moment! Thank you so much for this.

    Reply
    1. Sara in Stitches Post author

      Yay –that makes me so happy, Sandra! I hope it’s a success! And bless Mr. Rogers, whose legacy I have the deepest respect for, in all aspects outside his sartorial choices.

      Reply

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